Preparing scots pine stumps for Pinewood Hoverfly larvae. Rothiemurchus estate, East Highland Area. ©Lorne Gill/SNH_For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.nature.scot

Forests and woods with ongoing forest operations

Responsible behaviour by the public

The Access Code says:

Tree felling, timber extraction and haulage may affect an area of forest and forest roads for several months. Read any signs warning you of forest operations, such as tree felling and extraction, and follow any precautions taken by the land manager. This will ensure that you do not hinder these operations and ensure your safety and that of people working there. In some cases, signs may indicate that it is safe to go along a route if the activity has stopped, such as for the weekend.

If you come across machinery, keep a safe distance. Take extra care if you are walking, cycling or riding along forest tracks as heavy timber lorries might be using the tracks. Do not climb on to timber stacks and keep children away from them.

Responsible behaviour by land managers

The Access Code says:

Follow good practice, as set out in industry-approved guidance, in the management of work sites where people are taking access. Keep the area affected, and the duration and type of any precaution, to the minimum required. Tell people about these at the main access points and, if possible, provide alternative routes. If possible, concentrate felling and extraction at times when public use is likely to be lowest. Allow people to use particular routes when work has ended (such as for the weekend) and would not cause significant safety hazards. Ensure that all site operators and vehicle drivers are aware that people might be present.