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Heading for the Scottish Hills

Heading for the Scottish Hills

Scotland offers fantastic hillwalking, but summer and autumn are also important times for deer stalking, which is essential for sustainable deer management.

The Heading for the Scottish Hills service helps you find out where this is taking place during the stag stalking season (1st July to 20th October, but with most stalking from August onwards), so you can plan routes which minimise the chance of disturbing stalking, in line with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code.

Heading for the Scottish Hills - Stalking Area Tables provide stalking information for hills in different areas of Scotland.

Heading for the Scottish Hills map showing the areas of HFTSH service  ©SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.nature.scot

Heading for the Scottish Hills map showing the areas of HFTSH service

 

1. ISLANDS

2. NORTHERN HIGHLANDS
North of Glen Shiel and the Great Glen.

3. WESTERN HIGHLANDS
West of the Great Glen and south of Glen Shiel.

4. CREAG MEAGAIDH AND THE MONADHLIATH

5. EASTERN HIGHLANDS
East of the A9 (Perth-Inverness).

6. CENTRAL HIGHLANDS
Area enclosed by Loch Linnhe, Glen Spean, the A9 (Inverness-Perth) and the A85 (Perth-Lochearnhead-Crianlarich-Oban). Includes Glen Coe, Glen Nevis, Ben Lawers, Ben Alder and the Drumochter Hills (west).

7. SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS
South of the A85 (Perth-Lochearnhead-Crianlarich-Oban).

8. SOUTHERN UPLANDS

Some estates provide broad messages indicating the general period in which stag stalking takes place, with contact details if further information is needed. These messages do not mean that the hills are inaccessible during this period, and are simply an aid to planning to help you minimise the chance of disturbing stalking. In the absence of more specific information, you can often minimise the risk of disturbance by using paths and following ridges. Take account of reasonable advice that you receive on the day, for example from a sign or a stalker. If you feel that a land manager has given you unreasonable advice, you can report this to the local access officer.

For more information on access rights and deer stalking, see Deer stalking on the open hill.

Find out more